Expelled From Paradise

Expelled From Paradise

expelledfromparadise

  • Trailer: Preview trailer
  • What it’s about: The year is 2700, and the majority of humanity has escaped the increasingly hostile environment of Earth by uploading their minds to the digital playground of Deva. Indeed, most have never set foot in the physical world. Which is why it’s all the more concerning when a hacker from the outside breaks through Deva’s security to broadcast a message to its inhabitants, offering ludicrous sentiments about exploring the galaxy. A team of security personnel is assigned to track down and eliminate the hacker in the real world. Among them is Angela Balzac, a young woman desperate to prove her worth to her superiors.
  • Why you should watch it: It’s an interesting sci-fi detective story with a flair for adventure. The two mismatched personalities of Angela and her native Earth guide Dingo make for a fun dynamic and the dialogue between them is engaging and funny. There’s a solid sense of adventure woven through the plot as Angela explores the real world for the first time while Dingo does much of the actual case work. The action-packed finale is fantastically animated and choreographed, scratching the mecha-fighting itch that was promised in a lot of the promotional material. In all, it’s a good popcorn flick.
  • Caveats: Angela herself is almost painfully cliche as an anime character, right down to the suspiciously teenage body and brash attitude. While solidly written, the story doesn’t really offer much new – none of the themes are addressed in all that much depth, though it does at least touch on some interesting stuff here and there. Finally, it’s worth mentioning the graphics. It’s 3D-rendered with a sort of cel-animation aesthetic. If you’ve seen RWBY, it’s a lot like that.
  • Themes: Transhumanism, the ethics of meritocracies. Tradition vs modernity.
  • Similar works: Suisei no GargantiaSummer Wars. It also touches upon some of the same ideas and setting elements as Ergo Proxy and Ghost in the Shell, but both of those works are significantly darker.
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